The God Particle

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The God Particle

By Joel Moskowitz

Scientists have recently confirmed the existence of something called the “God Particle.” The scientific name for this particle is the “Higgs Boson,” named after the physicist who originally theorized its existence. The theory is that electroweak or elementary particles acquire mass by colliding with mass. Of course this would entail a great deal of force and speed. The idea behind the research is to confirm the existence of the “Big Bang Theory” and in essence how the world was created. For 50 years a laboratory in the suburbs of Geneva called CERN, has been using colliders to test the theory and recently after billions of dollars spent has identified the particle.

While physicists prefer to call it by its scientific name, “Higgs Boson,” almost everyone else calls it the God Particle. I think it’s obvious that we prefer God Particle because for up until about 700 years ago the only way humans could describe creation and the physical world was in religious terms. Since then science has added a different dimension to explaining creation. Or as I like to describe it, the world was chugging along at 30 MPH until about the 15th Century, then we put the pedal to the metal and have not taken our foot off since.

In order to reconcile the existence of God with Big Bang, religious people rely on two things that science can never explain; what came before Big Bang and the human conscience otherwise known as the soul. The scientific blueprint may prove exactly how the world was created and how we evolved but it fails to explain who or what pushed that first button. Science simply explains the existence of things in terms of time, space, motion and mass; religion explains things as beyond the scope of those logical things.

Young people today look at the world as less complicated than before. My kids still cannot believe I ever had to dial a phone number or had to go to the library to do research for a term paper. They barely know what a pay phone is and cannot fathom that anyone used a typewriter. But we older folks remember a simpler time when we were not connected to everything and everyone all day long. We spoke to our friends and family when we were near a phone and had something to say. We saw the news once a day and we read newspapers. More importantly, we took time out to recognize that there was a power greater than science and technology that explained things to us that logic could not. And we basked in the world’s relative simplicity.

I like the term God Particle because it denotes the limits of scientific explanation. There are just some things that cannot be explained and frankly shouldn’t be even in a world where information can be obtained in seconds on a smart phone. Mysticism tries to explain the unexplainable on a spiritual level but even the mastering of that discipline is limited to a select few. What excites me most about scientific revelations is not the absence of God but His apparent retraction. We used to need God to explain every element of the universe and our existence, now we really only need God to explain why we should choose good over evil, why we should tap into our soul.

Science enables us to limit religion to our homes and communities and to unify as the human race in wider areas. We no longer have to fight over who holds the ultimate truth because no matter which deity we worship science has proven He used one blueprint to get us all to this point. The rest is up to us. We are the only species that has the ability to retract from animal instincts. We are not predators and overall we seek to help one another. Science may explain which chemicals in our brain coax us to be altruistic but deep down we all know that only God has the power make us this way. In the immortal words of the great Bob Dylan:

“Well it may be the devil or it may be the Lord, but you gotta serve somebody.”

Filed Under: Joel MoskowitzOpinion

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